Posts Tagged ‘Maret’

3 LOWONGAN KERJA MARET JAKARTA 2011

Lowongan Kerja 2011 » Lowongan Kerja Maret 2011 » 3 LOWONGAN KERJA MARET JAKARTA 2011

3 LOWONGAN KERJA MARET JAKARTA 2011

Needs :
1. Supervisor Outsource Controller

* Min. D3 Graduated ( management, all)
* Male, age minimum 25 years.
* Min. 3 years experience in high rise building as supervisor.
* Preffered understanding in control outsource strong in high rise building.
* Have strong leadership.
* Good analytical to solve problem.
* Able to work under pressure and flexible working hours.

2. Admin Outsource Controller

* Max. D3 Graduated ( Informatika, administration,etc).
* Male, age between 21 – 25 years.
* Min. 1 years experience in high rise building.
* Can use computer with Ms. Office and Ms. Visio.
* Have ability to make presentation and adminstration database or worksheet
* Have good responsibility
* Able to work under pressure and flexible working hours.

3. Teknisi

* Min. STM Graduated ( Mechanical, Electro ).
* Male, age between 21 – 25 years.
* Min. 1 years experience in high rise building.
* Preffered understanding in control panel strong current.
* Have good responsibility
* Able to work under pressure and flexible working hours.
Human Resources

PT. VPC Asia Pacific (RMCI)
Jl. Industri Blok B.14 No.1
Komplek Kemayoran – Jakarta 10720

atau

Email: pm.rmci@gmail.com

Maya Sari
Sekretaris
Property Management Reformed Millennium Center Indonesia
Jl. Industri Blok B.14 No.1
Komplek Kemayoran – Jakarta 10720
Tel: +62 21 6586 7811
Fax: +62 21 6586 7818

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Lowongan Kerja Tambang Jambi Maret 2011


Lowongan Kerja Tambang pertambangan Jambi Maret 2011 tersedia 4 (empat) posisi
We are a growing coal company in Indonesia currently looking for a high professional to join the Company with job assignment in Sarolangun – Jambi, for the positions of :

1. Finance & Accounting Supervisor (FAS)
• Bachelor Degree (S1) in Economic/Accounting major.
• At least 3 years of relevant experience in Finance &
Accounting role.

• Qualified on cost accountant area.
• Having experience to making a financial & accounting report.
• Having strong ability to utilize MS Office Software (MS Word,
Excel & PowerPoint).
• Having strong analytical thinking and highly attentive to
details.
• Having strong interpersonal and communication skills (fluent
in English is preferable).

2. Mine Surveyor (MS)
• Male
• Minimum Diploma Degree (D3) in Land Surveying/Geomatic
Survey/Geodetic Engineering
• Having minimum 2 years experience in Mining Area
• Experience surveying in a open cut operation
• Setting out works for pit design, drilling and other mining
activities
• Topography update and details pick up within the mining area
• Good knowledge in survey computer (ACAD, Surpac and other
survey software)
• Familiarity with Launch Land Desktop (LDD) and Total Station
(TS) nicon

3. Personal Assistant (PA)
• Male
• Minimum Diploma Degree (D3) in any major
• Minimum 2 years experience as Personal Assistant
• Can do multi tasking job, can work under pressure and result
oriented
• Fluently in English
• Good in operating all MS Office and familiar with outlook
• Willing to be called once needed for urgent matters
• Competencies required: proactive, initiative, energetic,
highly discipline, creative, smart worker, interpersonal and
communication skills.
• Capable in handling report and filing document


4. Purchasing Supervisor (PS)

• Male
• Minimum Bachelor Degree (S1) in any major (Economy,
Management & Accounting is preferable)
• Minimum 3 years experience as Purchasing
• Able to make good relation with supplier / forwader / Sub
Contractor
• Strong negotiation skills and excellent communication
• Having strong ability to utilize MS Office Software (MS Word,
Excel & PowerPoint
• Preferable having knowledge about heavy equipment in mining
area

Please send your complete resume and recent photograph to recruitment@rgsr.co.id March, 18th 2011 by the latest. Please put position applied as an email subject.

For further informations, please check our website at www.rgsr.co.id

Tags: Lowongan Lulusan S1




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Job Interview Tips


An interview gives you the opportunity to showcase your qualifications to an employer, so it pays to be well prepared. The following information provides some helpful hints.



Preparation:

Learn about the organization.


Have a specific job or jobs in mind.

Review your qualifications for the job.


Be ready to briefly describe your experience, showing how it relates it the job.

Be ready to answer broad questions, such as “Why should I hire you?” “Why do you want this job?” “What are your strengths and weaknesses?”


Practice an interview with a friend or relative. More….

Evaluating a Job Offer



Once you receive a job offer, you must decide if you want the job. Fortunately, most organizations will give you a few days to accept or reject an offer.

There are many issues to consider when assessing a job offer. Will the organization be a good place to work? Will the job be interesting? Are there opportunities for advancement? Is the salary fair? Does the employer offer good benefits? Now is the time to ask the potential employer about these issues—and to do some checking on your own.


The organization. Background information on an organization can help you to decide whether it is a good place for you to work. Factors to consider include the organization’s business or activity, financial condition, age, size, and location.


You generally can get background information on an organization, particularly a large organization, on its Internet site or by telephoning its public relations office. A public company’s annual report to the stockholders tells about its corporate philosophy, history, products or services, goals, and financial status. Most government agencies can furnish reports that describe their programs and missions. Press releases, company newsletters or magazines, and recruitment brochures also can be useful. Ask the organization for any other items that might interest a prospective employee. If possible, speak to current or former employees of the organization.


Background information on the organization may be available at your public or school library. If you cannot get an annual report, check the library for reference directories that may provide basic facts about the company, such as earnings, products and services, and number of employees. Some directories widely available in libraries either in print or as online databases include:



Dun & Bradstreet’s Million Dollar Directory
Standard and Poor’s Register of Corporations
Mergent’s Industrial Review (formerly Moody’s Industrial Manual)
Thomas Register of American Manufacturers
Ward’s Business Directory

Stories about an organization in magazines and newspapers can tell a great deal about its successes, failures, and plans for the future. You can identify articles on a company by looking under its name in periodical or computerized indexes in libraries, or by using one of the Internet’s search engines. However, it probably will not be useful to look back more than 2 or 3 years.


The library also may have government publications that present projections of growth for the industry in which the organization is classified. Long-term projections of employment and output for detailed industries, covering the entire U.S. economy, are developed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and revised every 2 years. Trade magazines also may include articles on the trends for specific industries.



Career centers at colleges and universities often have information on employers that is not available in libraries. Ask a career center representative how to find out about a particular organization.

During your research consider the following questions:



Does the organization’s business or activity match your own interests and beliefs?

It is easier to apply yourself to the work if you are enthusiastic about what the organization does.


How will the size of the organization affect you?

Large firms generally offer a greater variety of training programs and career paths, more managerial levels for advancement, and better employee benefits than do small firms. Large employers also may have more advanced technologies. However, many jobs in large firms tend to be highly specialized.



Jobs in small firms may offer broader authority and responsibility, a closer working relationship with top management, and a chance to clearly see your contribution to the success of the organization.

Should you work for a relatively new organization or one that is well established?


New businesses have a high failure rate, but for many people, the excitement of helping to create a company and the potential for sharing in its success more than offset the risk of job loss. However, it may be just as exciting and rewarding to work for a young firm that already has a foothold on success.



The job. Even if everything else about the job is attractive, you will be unhappy if you dislike the day-to-day work. Determining in advance whether you will like the work may be difficult. However, the more you find out about the job before accepting or rejecting the offer, the more likely you are to make the right choice. Consider the following questions:

Where is the job located?
If the job is in another section of the country, you need to consider the cost of living, the availability of housing and transportation, and the quality of educational and recreational facilities in that section of the country. Even if the job location is in your area, you should consider the time and expense of commuting.



Does the work match your interests and make good use of your skills?
The duties and responsibilities of the job should be explained in enough detail to answer this question.

How important is the job to the company or organization?
An explanation of where you fit in the organization and how you are supposed to contribute to its overall goals should give you an idea of the job’s importance.



What will the hours be?
Most jobs involve regular hours—for example, 40 hours a week, during the day, Monday through Friday. Other jobs require night, weekend, or holiday work. In addition, some jobs routinely require overtime to meet deadlines or sales or production goals, or to better serve customers. Consider the effect that the work hours will have on your personal life.

How long do most people who enter this job stay with the company?
High turnover can mean dissatisfaction with the nature of the work or something else about the job.



Opportunities offered by employers. A good job offers you opportunities to learn new skills, increase your earnings, and rise to positions of greater authority, responsibility, and prestige. A lack of opportunities can dampen interest in the work and result in frustration and boredom.

The company should have a training plan for you. What valuable new skills does the company plan to teach you?



The employer should give you some idea of promotion possibilities within the organization. What is the next step on the career ladder? If you have to wait for a job to become vacant before you can be promoted, how long does this usually take? When opportunities for advancement do arise, will you compete with applicants from outside the company? Can you apply for jobs for which you qualify elsewhere within the organization, or is mobility within the firm limited?

Salaries and benefits. When an employer makes a job offer, information about earnings and benefits are usually included. You will want to research to determine if the offer is fair. If you choose to negotiate for higher pay and better benefits, objective research will help you strengthen your case.



You may have to go to several sources for information. One of the best places to start is the information from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

You should also look for additional information, specifically tailored to your job offer and circumstances. Try to find family, friends, or acquaintances who recently were hired in similar jobs. Ask your teachers and the staff in placement offices about starting pay for graduates with your qualifications. Help-wanted ads in newspapers sometimes give salary ranges for similar positions. Check the library or your school’s career center for salary surveys such as those conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers or various professional associations.



If you are considering the salary and benefits for a job in another geographic area, make allowances for differences in the cost of living, which may be significantly higher in a large metropolitan area than in a smaller city, town, or rural area.

You also should learn the organization’s policy regarding overtime. Depending on the job, you may or may not be exempt from laws requiring the employer to compensate you for overtime. Find out how many hours you will be expected to work each week and whether you receive overtime pay or compensatory time off for working more than the specified number of hours in a week.



Also take into account that the starting salary is just that—the start. Your salary should be reviewed on a regular basis; many organizations do it every year. How much can you expect to earn after 1, 2, or 3 or more years? An employer cannot be specific about the amount of pay if it includes commissions and bonuses.

Benefits also can add a lot to your base pay, but they vary widely. Find out exactly what the benefit package includes and how much of the cost you must bear.








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Lowongan Reporter di Kompas Gramedia Maret 2011


Lowongan kerja reporter di Kompas Gramedia Maret 2011 lulusan s1 untuk Jakarta Raya – Jakarta Barat
Starting from the Digest, published for the first time on August 7, 1963, now the Group of Magazine – Kompas Gramedia while maintaining the initial commitment to publishing products that provide quality information with respect to the values prevailing in society.

Business basis Group of Magazine – Kompas Gramedia is publishing periodicals. Until recently the Group of Magazine has more or less than 40 tabloids and magazines. In the future, the Group of Magazine will go into every segment of the existing and is in the position of market leader.
Cukup Dengan DP 3,5 Juta Anda Telah Terdaftar Menjadi Calon Jamaah Umroh/Haji Sekaligus Agen Biro Haji dan Umroh

To strengthen its position, the Group of Magazine – Kompas Gramedia into each segment in accordance with the existing business base by taking into account market developments and technologies such as print media, electronic media, digital initiative, events and communities as well as in the position of market leader.

Today we open the opportunity to join in some of the media guy, Automotive, Gadgets & Cellular and Interior as:


Reporter
(Jakarta Raya – Jakarta Barat)

Requirements:
* education S1 Journalism / Communications / Psychology / IT / Interior Design / Architectural Engineering and other
* Good Writing
* Able to speak English / other foreign
* Preferably with experience journalism
* Following the development of the field of interior / architecture / property (for reporters Interior)
* Attach: sample articles of your own work with a theme that you’re interested!

Kirim berkas lamaran lengkap Anda disertai CV, fotocopy transkrip dan ijasah, fotocopy KTP, dan pas foto terbaru secepatnya dengan disertai kode posisi subject email atau lamaran, ke:

HRD KOMPAS GRAMEDIA – Group of Magazine
Gd. Kompas Gramedia Unit 1 Lt.8
Jl. Panjang no. 8A, Kebon Jeruk
Jakarta 11530
Email: edina@gramedia-majalah.com

Tags: Lowongan Lulusan S1




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Lowongan Hari Ini

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Job Interview Tips


An interview gives you the opportunity to showcase your qualifications to an employer, so it pays to be well prepared. The following information provides some helpful hints.



Preparation:

Learn about the organization.


Have a specific job or jobs in mind.

Review your qualifications for the job.


Be ready to briefly describe your experience, showing how it relates it the job.

Be ready to answer broad questions, such as “Why should I hire you?” “Why do you want this job?” “What are your strengths and weaknesses?”


Practice an interview with a friend or relative. More….

Evaluating a Job Offer



Once you receive a job offer, you must decide if you want the job. Fortunately, most organizations will give you a few days to accept or reject an offer.

There are many issues to consider when assessing a job offer. Will the organization be a good place to work? Will the job be interesting? Are there opportunities for advancement? Is the salary fair? Does the employer offer good benefits? Now is the time to ask the potential employer about these issues—and to do some checking on your own.


The organization. Background information on an organization can help you to decide whether it is a good place for you to work. Factors to consider include the organization’s business or activity, financial condition, age, size, and location.


You generally can get background information on an organization, particularly a large organization, on its Internet site or by telephoning its public relations office. A public company’s annual report to the stockholders tells about its corporate philosophy, history, products or services, goals, and financial status. Most government agencies can furnish reports that describe their programs and missions. Press releases, company newsletters or magazines, and recruitment brochures also can be useful. Ask the organization for any other items that might interest a prospective employee. If possible, speak to current or former employees of the organization.


Background information on the organization may be available at your public or school library. If you cannot get an annual report, check the library for reference directories that may provide basic facts about the company, such as earnings, products and services, and number of employees. Some directories widely available in libraries either in print or as online databases include:



Dun & Bradstreet’s Million Dollar Directory
Standard and Poor’s Register of Corporations
Mergent’s Industrial Review (formerly Moody’s Industrial Manual)
Thomas Register of American Manufacturers
Ward’s Business Directory

Stories about an organization in magazines and newspapers can tell a great deal about its successes, failures, and plans for the future. You can identify articles on a company by looking under its name in periodical or computerized indexes in libraries, or by using one of the Internet’s search engines. However, it probably will not be useful to look back more than 2 or 3 years.


The library also may have government publications that present projections of growth for the industry in which the organization is classified. Long-term projections of employment and output for detailed industries, covering the entire U.S. economy, are developed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and revised every 2 years. Trade magazines also may include articles on the trends for specific industries.



Career centers at colleges and universities often have information on employers that is not available in libraries. Ask a career center representative how to find out about a particular organization.

During your research consider the following questions:



Does the organization’s business or activity match your own interests and beliefs?

It is easier to apply yourself to the work if you are enthusiastic about what the organization does.


How will the size of the organization affect you?

Large firms generally offer a greater variety of training programs and career paths, more managerial levels for advancement, and better employee benefits than do small firms. Large employers also may have more advanced technologies. However, many jobs in large firms tend to be highly specialized.



Jobs in small firms may offer broader authority and responsibility, a closer working relationship with top management, and a chance to clearly see your contribution to the success of the organization.

Should you work for a relatively new organization or one that is well established?


New businesses have a high failure rate, but for many people, the excitement of helping to create a company and the potential for sharing in its success more than offset the risk of job loss. However, it may be just as exciting and rewarding to work for a young firm that already has a foothold on success.



The job. Even if everything else about the job is attractive, you will be unhappy if you dislike the day-to-day work. Determining in advance whether you will like the work may be difficult. However, the more you find out about the job before accepting or rejecting the offer, the more likely you are to make the right choice. Consider the following questions:

Where is the job located?
If the job is in another section of the country, you need to consider the cost of living, the availability of housing and transportation, and the quality of educational and recreational facilities in that section of the country. Even if the job location is in your area, you should consider the time and expense of commuting.



Does the work match your interests and make good use of your skills?
The duties and responsibilities of the job should be explained in enough detail to answer this question.

How important is the job to the company or organization?
An explanation of where you fit in the organization and how you are supposed to contribute to its overall goals should give you an idea of the job’s importance.



What will the hours be?
Most jobs involve regular hours—for example, 40 hours a week, during the day, Monday through Friday. Other jobs require night, weekend, or holiday work. In addition, some jobs routinely require overtime to meet deadlines or sales or production goals, or to better serve customers. Consider the effect that the work hours will have on your personal life.

How long do most people who enter this job stay with the company?
High turnover can mean dissatisfaction with the nature of the work or something else about the job.



Opportunities offered by employers. A good job offers you opportunities to learn new skills, increase your earnings, and rise to positions of greater authority, responsibility, and prestige. A lack of opportunities can dampen interest in the work and result in frustration and boredom.

The company should have a training plan for you. What valuable new skills does the company plan to teach you?



The employer should give you some idea of promotion possibilities within the organization. What is the next step on the career ladder? If you have to wait for a job to become vacant before you can be promoted, how long does this usually take? When opportunities for advancement do arise, will you compete with applicants from outside the company? Can you apply for jobs for which you qualify elsewhere within the organization, or is mobility within the firm limited?

Salaries and benefits. When an employer makes a job offer, information about earnings and benefits are usually included. You will want to research to determine if the offer is fair. If you choose to negotiate for higher pay and better benefits, objective research will help you strengthen your case.



You may have to go to several sources for information. One of the best places to start is the information from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

You should also look for additional information, specifically tailored to your job offer and circumstances. Try to find family, friends, or acquaintances who recently were hired in similar jobs. Ask your teachers and the staff in placement offices about starting pay for graduates with your qualifications. Help-wanted ads in newspapers sometimes give salary ranges for similar positions. Check the library or your school’s career center for salary surveys such as those conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers or various professional associations.



If you are considering the salary and benefits for a job in another geographic area, make allowances for differences in the cost of living, which may be significantly higher in a large metropolitan area than in a smaller city, town, or rural area.

You also should learn the organization’s policy regarding overtime. Depending on the job, you may or may not be exempt from laws requiring the employer to compensate you for overtime. Find out how many hours you will be expected to work each week and whether you receive overtime pay or compensatory time off for working more than the specified number of hours in a week.



Also take into account that the starting salary is just that—the start. Your salary should be reviewed on a regular basis; many organizations do it every year. How much can you expect to earn after 1, 2, or 3 or more years? An employer cannot be specific about the amount of pay if it includes commissions and bonuses.

Benefits also can add a lot to your base pay, but they vary widely. Find out exactly what the benefit package includes and how much of the cost you must bear.








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Lowongan BUMN Krakatau Steel Maret 2011


Info Lowongan pekerjaan di BUMN PT Krakatau Steel Lulusan D3 & S1/S2 Maret 2011. Lokasi tes Cilegon – Jakarta Bandung Surabaya Yogyakarta

Krakatau Steel is the largest integrated steel producer in Southeast Asia. The company is also a producer of sheet steel hot (HRC) and cold steel sheet (CRC), the largest in Indonesia, each with a domestic market share of 47% and 33%, and manufacturer of steel wire rods, the second largest in Indonesia, with 32% domestic market share. In terms of product specifictions, Krakatau Steel controlled about 85% of the total product absorbed by the domestic market.

The company has a combined maximum steel capacity of 2.45 million tons per year. Importing raw materials including iron ore from countries in South America and the Middle East. Krakatau Steel sells most of its products in Indonesia especially in Jakarta and Surabaya. Meanwhile, a fraction of its product has been con- sumed, among others, by Australia, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, England and Vietnam.

Program Management Trainee (MT)

Requirements
* Maximum 26 years old (S1) and 24 years old (D3) by April 1, 2011
* Not married
* Not in services bond (ikatan dinas) with other institutions
* Indonesian citizen
* Bachelor (S1)/ Diploma (D3) Degree holder
* Minimum GPA 2.70 of 4.00 from accredited study program (minimum B)
* Willing to be placed in PT. Krakatau Steel & Group working (Cilegon, Jakarta and Kalimantan Selatan)
* Majoring in:
o S1 Civil Engineering
o S1 Enviromental Engineering
o S1 Law (Civil/ Criminal/ Business)
o S1 Metallurgy Engineering
o S1 Psychologist (Magister Profesi)
o D3 Archives (Kearsipan)
o D3 Chemical Analyst
o D3 Computer Engineering
o D3 Geomatics Engineering
o D3 Health and Safety (K3)
o D3 Information System
o D3 Maritime Governance (Tata Laksana Pelayaran)
o D3 Mechanical Engineering Material Science
o D3/S1 Accounting
o D3/S1 Chemical Engineering
o D3/S1 Communications
o D3/S1 Electrical Engineering (Elektro/ Listrik)
o D3/S1 Electronics Engineering (Elektronika)
o D3/S1 Industrial Engineering
o D3/S1 Management
o D3/S1 Mechanical Engineering


Test Locations

* Cilegon – UNTIRTA: March 16 – 17
* Jakarta – UI: March 18 – 19
* Bandung – ITB: March 18 – 19
* Surabaya – ITS: March 20 – 21
* Yogyakarta – UGM: March 20 – 21

Should you meet above requirements please download complete information brochure at first link below then apply at second link. Registration will be closed by March 11, 2011: 16.00 WIB.

Details :

  • Lowongan Krakatau Steel
  • Apply Online

Tags: lowongan kerja bumn




Langganan Info Lowongan Kerja via Email



Lowongan Hari Ini

Subscribe to RSS headline updates from:
Powered by FeedBurner







Cari Kerja via Google




Job Interview Tips


An interview gives you the opportunity to showcase your qualifications to an employer, so it pays to be well prepared. The following information provides some helpful hints.



Preparation:

Learn about the organization.


Have a specific job or jobs in mind.

Review your qualifications for the job.


Be ready to briefly describe your experience, showing how it relates it the job.

Be ready to answer broad questions, such as “Why should I hire you?” “Why do you want this job?” “What are your strengths and weaknesses?”


Practice an interview with a friend or relative. More….

Evaluating a Job Offer



Once you receive a job offer, you must decide if you want the job. Fortunately, most organizations will give you a few days to accept or reject an offer.

There are many issues to consider when assessing a job offer. Will the organization be a good place to work? Will the job be interesting? Are there opportunities for advancement? Is the salary fair? Does the employer offer good benefits? Now is the time to ask the potential employer about these issues—and to do some checking on your own.


The organization. Background information on an organization can help you to decide whether it is a good place for you to work. Factors to consider include the organization’s business or activity, financial condition, age, size, and location.


You generally can get background information on an organization, particularly a large organization, on its Internet site or by telephoning its public relations office. A public company’s annual report to the stockholders tells about its corporate philosophy, history, products or services, goals, and financial status. Most government agencies can furnish reports that describe their programs and missions. Press releases, company newsletters or magazines, and recruitment brochures also can be useful. Ask the organization for any other items that might interest a prospective employee. If possible, speak to current or former employees of the organization.


Background information on the organization may be available at your public or school library. If you cannot get an annual report, check the library for reference directories that may provide basic facts about the company, such as earnings, products and services, and number of employees. Some directories widely available in libraries either in print or as online databases include:



Dun & Bradstreet’s Million Dollar Directory
Standard and Poor’s Register of Corporations
Mergent’s Industrial Review (formerly Moody’s Industrial Manual)
Thomas Register of American Manufacturers
Ward’s Business Directory

Stories about an organization in magazines and newspapers can tell a great deal about its successes, failures, and plans for the future. You can identify articles on a company by looking under its name in periodical or computerized indexes in libraries, or by using one of the Internet’s search engines. However, it probably will not be useful to look back more than 2 or 3 years.


The library also may have government publications that present projections of growth for the industry in which the organization is classified. Long-term projections of employment and output for detailed industries, covering the entire U.S. economy, are developed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and revised every 2 years. Trade magazines also may include articles on the trends for specific industries.



Career centers at colleges and universities often have information on employers that is not available in libraries. Ask a career center representative how to find out about a particular organization.

During your research consider the following questions:



Does the organization’s business or activity match your own interests and beliefs?

It is easier to apply yourself to the work if you are enthusiastic about what the organization does.


How will the size of the organization affect you?

Large firms generally offer a greater variety of training programs and career paths, more managerial levels for advancement, and better employee benefits than do small firms. Large employers also may have more advanced technologies. However, many jobs in large firms tend to be highly specialized.



Jobs in small firms may offer broader authority and responsibility, a closer working relationship with top management, and a chance to clearly see your contribution to the success of the organization.

Should you work for a relatively new organization or one that is well established?


New businesses have a high failure rate, but for many people, the excitement of helping to create a company and the potential for sharing in its success more than offset the risk of job loss. However, it may be just as exciting and rewarding to work for a young firm that already has a foothold on success.



The job. Even if everything else about the job is attractive, you will be unhappy if you dislike the day-to-day work. Determining in advance whether you will like the work may be difficult. However, the more you find out about the job before accepting or rejecting the offer, the more likely you are to make the right choice. Consider the following questions:

Where is the job located?
If the job is in another section of the country, you need to consider the cost of living, the availability of housing and transportation, and the quality of educational and recreational facilities in that section of the country. Even if the job location is in your area, you should consider the time and expense of commuting.



Does the work match your interests and make good use of your skills?
The duties and responsibilities of the job should be explained in enough detail to answer this question.

How important is the job to the company or organization?
An explanation of where you fit in the organization and how you are supposed to contribute to its overall goals should give you an idea of the job’s importance.



What will the hours be?
Most jobs involve regular hours—for example, 40 hours a week, during the day, Monday through Friday. Other jobs require night, weekend, or holiday work. In addition, some jobs routinely require overtime to meet deadlines or sales or production goals, or to better serve customers. Consider the effect that the work hours will have on your personal life.

How long do most people who enter this job stay with the company?
High turnover can mean dissatisfaction with the nature of the work or something else about the job.



Opportunities offered by employers. A good job offers you opportunities to learn new skills, increase your earnings, and rise to positions of greater authority, responsibility, and prestige. A lack of opportunities can dampen interest in the work and result in frustration and boredom.

The company should have a training plan for you. What valuable new skills does the company plan to teach you?



The employer should give you some idea of promotion possibilities within the organization. What is the next step on the career ladder? If you have to wait for a job to become vacant before you can be promoted, how long does this usually take? When opportunities for advancement do arise, will you compete with applicants from outside the company? Can you apply for jobs for which you qualify elsewhere within the organization, or is mobility within the firm limited?

Salaries and benefits. When an employer makes a job offer, information about earnings and benefits are usually included. You will want to research to determine if the offer is fair. If you choose to negotiate for higher pay and better benefits, objective research will help you strengthen your case.



You may have to go to several sources for information. One of the best places to start is the information from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

You should also look for additional information, specifically tailored to your job offer and circumstances. Try to find family, friends, or acquaintances who recently were hired in similar jobs. Ask your teachers and the staff in placement offices about starting pay for graduates with your qualifications. Help-wanted ads in newspapers sometimes give salary ranges for similar positions. Check the library or your school’s career center for salary surveys such as those conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers or various professional associations.



If you are considering the salary and benefits for a job in another geographic area, make allowances for differences in the cost of living, which may be significantly higher in a large metropolitan area than in a smaller city, town, or rural area.

You also should learn the organization’s policy regarding overtime. Depending on the job, you may or may not be exempt from laws requiring the employer to compensate you for overtime. Find out how many hours you will be expected to work each week and whether you receive overtime pay or compensatory time off for working more than the specified number of hours in a week.



Also take into account that the starting salary is just that—the start. Your salary should be reviewed on a regular basis; many organizations do it every year. How much can you expect to earn after 1, 2, or 3 or more years? An employer cannot be specific about the amount of pay if it includes commissions and bonuses.

Benefits also can add a lot to your base pay, but they vary widely. Find out exactly what the benefit package includes and how much of the cost you must bear.








Comments are closed.




Tags: , , , , ,

Lowongan Resepsionist Kelly Services Indonesia Maret 2011


Lowongan Resepsionist Kelly Services Indonesia Maret 2011
RGENTLY REQUIRED

PT. Kelly Services Indonesia, Multinational services Company, inviting qualified individuals to join our team for the following available position:

RECEPTIONIST


* Female with maximum age 25 years old
* Single

* Candidate must posses at least a Degree in any major
* Fresh Graduate or Minimum 1 year working experiences as a Receptionist
* Good communication skill both in Indonesia & English (daily conversation)
* Dicipline, good looking and hospitable
* Able to work under minimum supervision, team player and multi tasking
* Able to use Microsoft Office (M. Excel, M.Word etc. )

Should you meet the above requirements, please send your application with detailed resume and recent photograph to below address and please put the subject (RCPT&ADM – Name) for the position applied.

e-mail : merys_ladiarosma@bticonsultants.com
website : www.kellyservices.co.id
address : Mayapada Tower, 9th floor. Jl. Jend. Sudirman Kav. 28 Jakarta 12920

Tags: lowongan fresh graduate




Langganan Info Lowongan Kerja via Email



Lowongan Hari Ini

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Cari Kerja via Google




Job Interview Tips


An interview gives you the opportunity to showcase your qualifications to an employer, so it pays to be well prepared. The following information provides some helpful hints.



Preparation:

Learn about the organization.


Have a specific job or jobs in mind.

Review your qualifications for the job.


Be ready to briefly describe your experience, showing how it relates it the job.

Be ready to answer broad questions, such as “Why should I hire you?” “Why do you want this job?” “What are your strengths and weaknesses?”


Practice an interview with a friend or relative. More….

Evaluating a Job Offer



Once you receive a job offer, you must decide if you want the job. Fortunately, most organizations will give you a few days to accept or reject an offer.

There are many issues to consider when assessing a job offer. Will the organization be a good place to work? Will the job be interesting? Are there opportunities for advancement? Is the salary fair? Does the employer offer good benefits? Now is the time to ask the potential employer about these issues—and to do some checking on your own.


The organization. Background information on an organization can help you to decide whether it is a good place for you to work. Factors to consider include the organization’s business or activity, financial condition, age, size, and location.


You generally can get background information on an organization, particularly a large organization, on its Internet site or by telephoning its public relations office. A public company’s annual report to the stockholders tells about its corporate philosophy, history, products or services, goals, and financial status. Most government agencies can furnish reports that describe their programs and missions. Press releases, company newsletters or magazines, and recruitment brochures also can be useful. Ask the organization for any other items that might interest a prospective employee. If possible, speak to current or former employees of the organization.


Background information on the organization may be available at your public or school library. If you cannot get an annual report, check the library for reference directories that may provide basic facts about the company, such as earnings, products and services, and number of employees. Some directories widely available in libraries either in print or as online databases include:



Dun & Bradstreet’s Million Dollar Directory
Standard and Poor’s Register of Corporations
Mergent’s Industrial Review (formerly Moody’s Industrial Manual)
Thomas Register of American Manufacturers
Ward’s Business Directory

Stories about an organization in magazines and newspapers can tell a great deal about its successes, failures, and plans for the future. You can identify articles on a company by looking under its name in periodical or computerized indexes in libraries, or by using one of the Internet’s search engines. However, it probably will not be useful to look back more than 2 or 3 years.


The library also may have government publications that present projections of growth for the industry in which the organization is classified. Long-term projections of employment and output for detailed industries, covering the entire U.S. economy, are developed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and revised every 2 years. Trade magazines also may include articles on the trends for specific industries.



Career centers at colleges and universities often have information on employers that is not available in libraries. Ask a career center representative how to find out about a particular organization.

During your research consider the following questions:



Does the organization’s business or activity match your own interests and beliefs?

It is easier to apply yourself to the work if you are enthusiastic about what the organization does.


How will the size of the organization affect you?

Large firms generally offer a greater variety of training programs and career paths, more managerial levels for advancement, and better employee benefits than do small firms. Large employers also may have more advanced technologies. However, many jobs in large firms tend to be highly specialized.



Jobs in small firms may offer broader authority and responsibility, a closer working relationship with top management, and a chance to clearly see your contribution to the success of the organization.

Should you work for a relatively new organization or one that is well established?


New businesses have a high failure rate, but for many people, the excitement of helping to create a company and the potential for sharing in its success more than offset the risk of job loss. However, it may be just as exciting and rewarding to work for a young firm that already has a foothold on success.



The job. Even if everything else about the job is attractive, you will be unhappy if you dislike the day-to-day work. Determining in advance whether you will like the work may be difficult. However, the more you find out about the job before accepting or rejecting the offer, the more likely you are to make the right choice. Consider the following questions:

Where is the job located?
If the job is in another section of the country, you need to consider the cost of living, the availability of housing and transportation, and the quality of educational and recreational facilities in that section of the country. Even if the job location is in your area, you should consider the time and expense of commuting.



Does the work match your interests and make good use of your skills?
The duties and responsibilities of the job should be explained in enough detail to answer this question.

How important is the job to the company or organization?
An explanation of where you fit in the organization and how you are supposed to contribute to its overall goals should give you an idea of the job’s importance.



What will the hours be?
Most jobs involve regular hours—for example, 40 hours a week, during the day, Monday through Friday. Other jobs require night, weekend, or holiday work. In addition, some jobs routinely require overtime to meet deadlines or sales or production goals, or to better serve customers. Consider the effect that the work hours will have on your personal life.

How long do most people who enter this job stay with the company?
High turnover can mean dissatisfaction with the nature of the work or something else about the job.



Opportunities offered by employers. A good job offers you opportunities to learn new skills, increase your earnings, and rise to positions of greater authority, responsibility, and prestige. A lack of opportunities can dampen interest in the work and result in frustration and boredom.

The company should have a training plan for you. What valuable new skills does the company plan to teach you?



The employer should give you some idea of promotion possibilities within the organization. What is the next step on the career ladder? If you have to wait for a job to become vacant before you can be promoted, how long does this usually take? When opportunities for advancement do arise, will you compete with applicants from outside the company? Can you apply for jobs for which you qualify elsewhere within the organization, or is mobility within the firm limited?

Salaries and benefits. When an employer makes a job offer, information about earnings and benefits are usually included. You will want to research to determine if the offer is fair. If you choose to negotiate for higher pay and better benefits, objective research will help you strengthen your case.



You may have to go to several sources for information. One of the best places to start is the information from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

You should also look for additional information, specifically tailored to your job offer and circumstances. Try to find family, friends, or acquaintances who recently were hired in similar jobs. Ask your teachers and the staff in placement offices about starting pay for graduates with your qualifications. Help-wanted ads in newspapers sometimes give salary ranges for similar positions. Check the library or your school’s career center for salary surveys such as those conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers or various professional associations.



If you are considering the salary and benefits for a job in another geographic area, make allowances for differences in the cost of living, which may be significantly higher in a large metropolitan area than in a smaller city, town, or rural area.

You also should learn the organization’s policy regarding overtime. Depending on the job, you may or may not be exempt from laws requiring the employer to compensate you for overtime. Find out how many hours you will be expected to work each week and whether you receive overtime pay or compensatory time off for working more than the specified number of hours in a week.



Also take into account that the starting salary is just that—the start. Your salary should be reviewed on a regular basis; many organizations do it every year. How much can you expect to earn after 1, 2, or 3 or more years? An employer cannot be specific about the amount of pay if it includes commissions and bonuses.

Benefits also can add a lot to your base pay, but they vary widely. Find out exactly what the benefit package includes and how much of the cost you must bear.








Comments are closed.




Tags: , , , , , ,

Lowongan Sekretaris Maret 2011 Perusahaan PMA


Lowongan Sekretaris Maret 2011 Perusahaan PMA
LOWONGAN SECRETARY CONTAINER DEPOT, TRUCKING AND WAREHOUSE AT CAKUNG CILINCING
URGENTLY REQUIRED

We are Multinational Company providing Import-Export & local Logistics & Trucking services located at Cakung Cilincing, North Jakarta, are seeking for YOUNG, DYNAMIC AND RESPONSIBLE inviduals to joint us as:

Staff Maintenance

- Male, minimum Diploma/Bachelor Degree in Technical Machine.

- Preferred fresh graduate; will be educated to be the qualified Mechanic staff.

- Ability to communicate in English both oral and written.

- Pleasant personality, willing to learn, self motivated, independent, flexible, intelligent and sympathetic

- Good team player, hard working and could work under pressure.

- Domiciled at Jakarta

Secretary


- Female, Single, max 25 years of age.

- Min. Diploma Degree and above (Majoring in Secretarial/Business Administration)

- Able to handle multiple tasks and to work under pressure.

- Pleasant looking with good personality.

- Fluent in English both oral and written, Mandarin language preferred.

- Computer Literate

- Have basic knowledge in developing system is advantage.

- Domiciled at Jakarta

If you meet the above qualifications, please submit your comprehensive resume, expected salaries along with recent photograph to: e-mail : pud@mbpi.co.id / sup@mbpi.co.id

Tags: lowongan kerja d3




Langganan Info Lowongan Kerja via Email



Lowongan Hari Ini

Subscribe to RSS headline updates from:
Powered by FeedBurner







Cari Kerja via Google




Job Interview Tips


An interview gives you the opportunity to showcase your qualifications to an employer, so it pays to be well prepared. The following information provides some helpful hints.



Preparation:

Learn about the organization.


Have a specific job or jobs in mind.

Review your qualifications for the job.


Be ready to briefly describe your experience, showing how it relates it the job.

Be ready to answer broad questions, such as “Why should I hire you?” “Why do you want this job?” “What are your strengths and weaknesses?”


Practice an interview with a friend or relative. More….

Evaluating a Job Offer



Once you receive a job offer, you must decide if you want the job. Fortunately, most organizations will give you a few days to accept or reject an offer.

There are many issues to consider when assessing a job offer. Will the organization be a good place to work? Will the job be interesting? Are there opportunities for advancement? Is the salary fair? Does the employer offer good benefits? Now is the time to ask the potential employer about these issues—and to do some checking on your own.


The organization. Background information on an organization can help you to decide whether it is a good place for you to work. Factors to consider include the organization’s business or activity, financial condition, age, size, and location.


You generally can get background information on an organization, particularly a large organization, on its Internet site or by telephoning its public relations office. A public company’s annual report to the stockholders tells about its corporate philosophy, history, products or services, goals, and financial status. Most government agencies can furnish reports that describe their programs and missions. Press releases, company newsletters or magazines, and recruitment brochures also can be useful. Ask the organization for any other items that might interest a prospective employee. If possible, speak to current or former employees of the organization.


Background information on the organization may be available at your public or school library. If you cannot get an annual report, check the library for reference directories that may provide basic facts about the company, such as earnings, products and services, and number of employees. Some directories widely available in libraries either in print or as online databases include:



Dun & Bradstreet’s Million Dollar Directory
Standard and Poor’s Register of Corporations
Mergent’s Industrial Review (formerly Moody’s Industrial Manual)
Thomas Register of American Manufacturers
Ward’s Business Directory

Stories about an organization in magazines and newspapers can tell a great deal about its successes, failures, and plans for the future. You can identify articles on a company by looking under its name in periodical or computerized indexes in libraries, or by using one of the Internet’s search engines. However, it probably will not be useful to look back more than 2 or 3 years.


The library also may have government publications that present projections of growth for the industry in which the organization is classified. Long-term projections of employment and output for detailed industries, covering the entire U.S. economy, are developed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and revised every 2 years. Trade magazines also may include articles on the trends for specific industries.



Career centers at colleges and universities often have information on employers that is not available in libraries. Ask a career center representative how to find out about a particular organization.

During your research consider the following questions:



Does the organization’s business or activity match your own interests and beliefs?

It is easier to apply yourself to the work if you are enthusiastic about what the organization does.


How will the size of the organization affect you?

Large firms generally offer a greater variety of training programs and career paths, more managerial levels for advancement, and better employee benefits than do small firms. Large employers also may have more advanced technologies. However, many jobs in large firms tend to be highly specialized.



Jobs in small firms may offer broader authority and responsibility, a closer working relationship with top management, and a chance to clearly see your contribution to the success of the organization.

Should you work for a relatively new organization or one that is well established?


New businesses have a high failure rate, but for many people, the excitement of helping to create a company and the potential for sharing in its success more than offset the risk of job loss. However, it may be just as exciting and rewarding to work for a young firm that already has a foothold on success.



The job. Even if everything else about the job is attractive, you will be unhappy if you dislike the day-to-day work. Determining in advance whether you will like the work may be difficult. However, the more you find out about the job before accepting or rejecting the offer, the more likely you are to make the right choice. Consider the following questions:

Where is the job located?
If the job is in another section of the country, you need to consider the cost of living, the availability of housing and transportation, and the quality of educational and recreational facilities in that section of the country. Even if the job location is in your area, you should consider the time and expense of commuting.



Does the work match your interests and make good use of your skills?
The duties and responsibilities of the job should be explained in enough detail to answer this question.

How important is the job to the company or organization?
An explanation of where you fit in the organization and how you are supposed to contribute to its overall goals should give you an idea of the job’s importance.



What will the hours be?
Most jobs involve regular hours—for example, 40 hours a week, during the day, Monday through Friday. Other jobs require night, weekend, or holiday work. In addition, some jobs routinely require overtime to meet deadlines or sales or production goals, or to better serve customers. Consider the effect that the work hours will have on your personal life.

How long do most people who enter this job stay with the company?
High turnover can mean dissatisfaction with the nature of the work or something else about the job.



Opportunities offered by employers. A good job offers you opportunities to learn new skills, increase your earnings, and rise to positions of greater authority, responsibility, and prestige. A lack of opportunities can dampen interest in the work and result in frustration and boredom.

The company should have a training plan for you. What valuable new skills does the company plan to teach you?



The employer should give you some idea of promotion possibilities within the organization. What is the next step on the career ladder? If you have to wait for a job to become vacant before you can be promoted, how long does this usually take? When opportunities for advancement do arise, will you compete with applicants from outside the company? Can you apply for jobs for which you qualify elsewhere within the organization, or is mobility within the firm limited?

Salaries and benefits. When an employer makes a job offer, information about earnings and benefits are usually included. You will want to research to determine if the offer is fair. If you choose to negotiate for higher pay and better benefits, objective research will help you strengthen your case.



You may have to go to several sources for information. One of the best places to start is the information from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

You should also look for additional information, specifically tailored to your job offer and circumstances. Try to find family, friends, or acquaintances who recently were hired in similar jobs. Ask your teachers and the staff in placement offices about starting pay for graduates with your qualifications. Help-wanted ads in newspapers sometimes give salary ranges for similar positions. Check the library or your school’s career center for salary surveys such as those conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers or various professional associations.



If you are considering the salary and benefits for a job in another geographic area, make allowances for differences in the cost of living, which may be significantly higher in a large metropolitan area than in a smaller city, town, or rural area.

You also should learn the organization’s policy regarding overtime. Depending on the job, you may or may not be exempt from laws requiring the employer to compensate you for overtime. Find out how many hours you will be expected to work each week and whether you receive overtime pay or compensatory time off for working more than the specified number of hours in a week.



Also take into account that the starting salary is just that—the start. Your salary should be reviewed on a regular basis; many organizations do it every year. How much can you expect to earn after 1, 2, or 3 or more years? An employer cannot be specific about the amount of pay if it includes commissions and bonuses.

Benefits also can add a lot to your base pay, but they vary widely. Find out exactly what the benefit package includes and how much of the cost you must bear.








Comments are closed.




Tags: , , , ,

Lowongan BUMN EMI Maret 2011


Info Lowongan Kerja BUMN Engineering Staff PT Energy Management Indonesia (EMI) (Persero) Maret 2011
PT. Energy Management Indonesia (Persero) or formerly known as PT. Koneba (Persero) was established in 1987, is government institution which engaged in the field of conservation and energy management.

From year to year, we had help the government, other government institutions, and private company in risk management activities, energy audits, commissioning testing, energy inspection and labeling, technical consultancy, energy and environmental studies.

Implementation of our business activities were conducted by trained and professional staffs in their field and supported by adequate equipment as needed. Our accumulated experience in various sectors in society and many industries added value in the implementation of our business conducted the study tasks, conservation, management and energy diversification.

Engineering Staff (Jakarta Raya)

Requirements:


* Male
* Bachelor degree (S-1) in Mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, engineering physics
* Good spoken and written communication in English
* Excellent communication skills and teamwork player
* Honest, good initiative and willing to learn attitude
* Electrical Engineering degree and expert for networking & electric power are preferred
* Fresh Graduate are welcome to apply

FOR COMPLETENESS OF THE ADMINISTRATION, PLEASE COMPLETE THE FOLLOWING DOCUMENTS :

1. CV
2. Copy of id card
3. Copy of Certificate of bachelor degree
4. Copy of NPWP
5. Please Provide copy of certificate

If you feel rewuirements, please follow this link below for apply :

  • Apply Here

Tags: lowongan kerja bumn




Langganan Info Lowongan Kerja via Email



Lowongan Hari Ini

Subscribe to RSS headline updates from:
Powered by FeedBurner







Cari Kerja via Google




Job Interview Tips


An interview gives you the opportunity to showcase your qualifications to an employer, so it pays to be well prepared. The following information provides some helpful hints.



Preparation:

Learn about the organization.


Have a specific job or jobs in mind.

Review your qualifications for the job.


Be ready to briefly describe your experience, showing how it relates it the job.

Be ready to answer broad questions, such as “Why should I hire you?” “Why do you want this job?” “What are your strengths and weaknesses?”


Practice an interview with a friend or relative. More….

Evaluating a Job Offer



Once you receive a job offer, you must decide if you want the job. Fortunately, most organizations will give you a few days to accept or reject an offer.

There are many issues to consider when assessing a job offer. Will the organization be a good place to work? Will the job be interesting? Are there opportunities for advancement? Is the salary fair? Does the employer offer good benefits? Now is the time to ask the potential employer about these issues—and to do some checking on your own.


The organization. Background information on an organization can help you to decide whether it is a good place for you to work. Factors to consider include the organization’s business or activity, financial condition, age, size, and location.


You generally can get background information on an organization, particularly a large organization, on its Internet site or by telephoning its public relations office. A public company’s annual report to the stockholders tells about its corporate philosophy, history, products or services, goals, and financial status. Most government agencies can furnish reports that describe their programs and missions. Press releases, company newsletters or magazines, and recruitment brochures also can be useful. Ask the organization for any other items that might interest a prospective employee. If possible, speak to current or former employees of the organization.


Background information on the organization may be available at your public or school library. If you cannot get an annual report, check the library for reference directories that may provide basic facts about the company, such as earnings, products and services, and number of employees. Some directories widely available in libraries either in print or as online databases include:



Dun & Bradstreet’s Million Dollar Directory
Standard and Poor’s Register of Corporations
Mergent’s Industrial Review (formerly Moody’s Industrial Manual)
Thomas Register of American Manufacturers
Ward’s Business Directory

Stories about an organization in magazines and newspapers can tell a great deal about its successes, failures, and plans for the future. You can identify articles on a company by looking under its name in periodical or computerized indexes in libraries, or by using one of the Internet’s search engines. However, it probably will not be useful to look back more than 2 or 3 years.


The library also may have government publications that present projections of growth for the industry in which the organization is classified. Long-term projections of employment and output for detailed industries, covering the entire U.S. economy, are developed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and revised every 2 years. Trade magazines also may include articles on the trends for specific industries.



Career centers at colleges and universities often have information on employers that is not available in libraries. Ask a career center representative how to find out about a particular organization.

During your research consider the following questions:



Does the organization’s business or activity match your own interests and beliefs?

It is easier to apply yourself to the work if you are enthusiastic about what the organization does.


How will the size of the organization affect you?

Large firms generally offer a greater variety of training programs and career paths, more managerial levels for advancement, and better employee benefits than do small firms. Large employers also may have more advanced technologies. However, many jobs in large firms tend to be highly specialized.



Jobs in small firms may offer broader authority and responsibility, a closer working relationship with top management, and a chance to clearly see your contribution to the success of the organization.

Should you work for a relatively new organization or one that is well established?


New businesses have a high failure rate, but for many people, the excitement of helping to create a company and the potential for sharing in its success more than offset the risk of job loss. However, it may be just as exciting and rewarding to work for a young firm that already has a foothold on success.



The job. Even if everything else about the job is attractive, you will be unhappy if you dislike the day-to-day work. Determining in advance whether you will like the work may be difficult. However, the more you find out about the job before accepting or rejecting the offer, the more likely you are to make the right choice. Consider the following questions:

Where is the job located?
If the job is in another section of the country, you need to consider the cost of living, the availability of housing and transportation, and the quality of educational and recreational facilities in that section of the country. Even if the job location is in your area, you should consider the time and expense of commuting.



Does the work match your interests and make good use of your skills?
The duties and responsibilities of the job should be explained in enough detail to answer this question.

How important is the job to the company or organization?
An explanation of where you fit in the organization and how you are supposed to contribute to its overall goals should give you an idea of the job’s importance.



What will the hours be?
Most jobs involve regular hours—for example, 40 hours a week, during the day, Monday through Friday. Other jobs require night, weekend, or holiday work. In addition, some jobs routinely require overtime to meet deadlines or sales or production goals, or to better serve customers. Consider the effect that the work hours will have on your personal life.

How long do most people who enter this job stay with the company?
High turnover can mean dissatisfaction with the nature of the work or something else about the job.



Opportunities offered by employers. A good job offers you opportunities to learn new skills, increase your earnings, and rise to positions of greater authority, responsibility, and prestige. A lack of opportunities can dampen interest in the work and result in frustration and boredom.

The company should have a training plan for you. What valuable new skills does the company plan to teach you?



The employer should give you some idea of promotion possibilities within the organization. What is the next step on the career ladder? If you have to wait for a job to become vacant before you can be promoted, how long does this usually take? When opportunities for advancement do arise, will you compete with applicants from outside the company? Can you apply for jobs for which you qualify elsewhere within the organization, or is mobility within the firm limited?

Salaries and benefits. When an employer makes a job offer, information about earnings and benefits are usually included. You will want to research to determine if the offer is fair. If you choose to negotiate for higher pay and better benefits, objective research will help you strengthen your case.



You may have to go to several sources for information. One of the best places to start is the information from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

You should also look for additional information, specifically tailored to your job offer and circumstances. Try to find family, friends, or acquaintances who recently were hired in similar jobs. Ask your teachers and the staff in placement offices about starting pay for graduates with your qualifications. Help-wanted ads in newspapers sometimes give salary ranges for similar positions. Check the library or your school’s career center for salary surveys such as those conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers or various professional associations.



If you are considering the salary and benefits for a job in another geographic area, make allowances for differences in the cost of living, which may be significantly higher in a large metropolitan area than in a smaller city, town, or rural area.

You also should learn the organization’s policy regarding overtime. Depending on the job, you may or may not be exempt from laws requiring the employer to compensate you for overtime. Find out how many hours you will be expected to work each week and whether you receive overtime pay or compensatory time off for working more than the specified number of hours in a week.



Also take into account that the starting salary is just that—the start. Your salary should be reviewed on a regular basis; many organizations do it every year. How much can you expect to earn after 1, 2, or 3 or more years? An employer cannot be specific about the amount of pay if it includes commissions and bonuses.

Benefits also can add a lot to your base pay, but they vary widely. Find out exactly what the benefit package includes and how much of the cost you must bear.








Comments are closed.




Tags: , , ,

Lowongan BUMN EMI Maret 2011


Info Lowongan Kerja BUMN Engineering Staff PT Energy Management Indonesia (EMI) (Persero) Maret 2011
PT. Energy Management Indonesia (Persero) or formerly known as PT. Koneba (Persero) was established in 1987, is government institution which engaged in the field of conservation and energy management.

From year to year, we had help the government, other government institutions, and private company in risk management activities, energy audits, commissioning testing, energy inspection and labeling, technical consultancy, energy and environmental studies.

Implementation of our business activities were conducted by trained and professional staffs in their field and supported by adequate equipment as needed. Our accumulated experience in various sectors in society and many industries added value in the implementation of our business conducted the study tasks, conservation, management and energy diversification.

Engineering Staff (Jakarta Raya)

Requirements:


* Male
* Bachelor degree (S-1) in Mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, engineering physics
* Good spoken and written communication in English
* Excellent communication skills and teamwork player
* Honest, good initiative and willing to learn attitude
* Electrical Engineering degree and expert for networking & electric power are preferred
* Fresh Graduate are welcome to apply

FOR COMPLETENESS OF THE ADMINISTRATION, PLEASE COMPLETE THE FOLLOWING DOCUMENTS :

1. CV
2. Copy of id card
3. Copy of Certificate of bachelor degree
4. Copy of NPWP
5. Please Provide copy of certificate

If you feel rewuirements, please follow this link below for apply :

  • Apply Here

Tags: lowongan kerja bumn




Langganan Info Lowongan Kerja via Email



Lowongan Hari Ini

Subscribe to RSS headline updates from:
Powered by FeedBurner







Cari Kerja via Google




Job Interview Tips


An interview gives you the opportunity to showcase your qualifications to an employer, so it pays to be well prepared. The following information provides some helpful hints.



Preparation:

Learn about the organization.


Have a specific job or jobs in mind.

Review your qualifications for the job.


Be ready to briefly describe your experience, showing how it relates it the job.

Be ready to answer broad questions, such as “Why should I hire you?” “Why do you want this job?” “What are your strengths and weaknesses?”


Practice an interview with a friend or relative. More….

Evaluating a Job Offer



Once you receive a job offer, you must decide if you want the job. Fortunately, most organizations will give you a few days to accept or reject an offer.

There are many issues to consider when assessing a job offer. Will the organization be a good place to work? Will the job be interesting? Are there opportunities for advancement? Is the salary fair? Does the employer offer good benefits? Now is the time to ask the potential employer about these issues—and to do some checking on your own.


The organization. Background information on an organization can help you to decide whether it is a good place for you to work. Factors to consider include the organization’s business or activity, financial condition, age, size, and location.


You generally can get background information on an organization, particularly a large organization, on its Internet site or by telephoning its public relations office. A public company’s annual report to the stockholders tells about its corporate philosophy, history, products or services, goals, and financial status. Most government agencies can furnish reports that describe their programs and missions. Press releases, company newsletters or magazines, and recruitment brochures also can be useful. Ask the organization for any other items that might interest a prospective employee. If possible, speak to current or former employees of the organization.


Background information on the organization may be available at your public or school library. If you cannot get an annual report, check the library for reference directories that may provide basic facts about the company, such as earnings, products and services, and number of employees. Some directories widely available in libraries either in print or as online databases include:



Dun & Bradstreet’s Million Dollar Directory
Standard and Poor’s Register of Corporations
Mergent’s Industrial Review (formerly Moody’s Industrial Manual)
Thomas Register of American Manufacturers
Ward’s Business Directory

Stories about an organization in magazines and newspapers can tell a great deal about its successes, failures, and plans for the future. You can identify articles on a company by looking under its name in periodical or computerized indexes in libraries, or by using one of the Internet’s search engines. However, it probably will not be useful to look back more than 2 or 3 years.


The library also may have government publications that present projections of growth for the industry in which the organization is classified. Long-term projections of employment and output for detailed industries, covering the entire U.S. economy, are developed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and revised every 2 years. Trade magazines also may include articles on the trends for specific industries.



Career centers at colleges and universities often have information on employers that is not available in libraries. Ask a career center representative how to find out about a particular organization.

During your research consider the following questions:



Does the organization’s business or activity match your own interests and beliefs?

It is easier to apply yourself to the work if you are enthusiastic about what the organization does.


How will the size of the organization affect you?

Large firms generally offer a greater variety of training programs and career paths, more managerial levels for advancement, and better employee benefits than do small firms. Large employers also may have more advanced technologies. However, many jobs in large firms tend to be highly specialized.



Jobs in small firms may offer broader authority and responsibility, a closer working relationship with top management, and a chance to clearly see your contribution to the success of the organization.

Should you work for a relatively new organization or one that is well established?


New businesses have a high failure rate, but for many people, the excitement of helping to create a company and the potential for sharing in its success more than offset the risk of job loss. However, it may be just as exciting and rewarding to work for a young firm that already has a foothold on success.



The job. Even if everything else about the job is attractive, you will be unhappy if you dislike the day-to-day work. Determining in advance whether you will like the work may be difficult. However, the more you find out about the job before accepting or rejecting the offer, the more likely you are to make the right choice. Consider the following questions:

Where is the job located?
If the job is in another section of the country, you need to consider the cost of living, the availability of housing and transportation, and the quality of educational and recreational facilities in that section of the country. Even if the job location is in your area, you should consider the time and expense of commuting.



Does the work match your interests and make good use of your skills?
The duties and responsibilities of the job should be explained in enough detail to answer this question.

How important is the job to the company or organization?
An explanation of where you fit in the organization and how you are supposed to contribute to its overall goals should give you an idea of the job’s importance.



What will the hours be?
Most jobs involve regular hours—for example, 40 hours a week, during the day, Monday through Friday. Other jobs require night, weekend, or holiday work. In addition, some jobs routinely require overtime to meet deadlines or sales or production goals, or to better serve customers. Consider the effect that the work hours will have on your personal life.

How long do most people who enter this job stay with the company?
High turnover can mean dissatisfaction with the nature of the work or something else about the job.



Opportunities offered by employers. A good job offers you opportunities to learn new skills, increase your earnings, and rise to positions of greater authority, responsibility, and prestige. A lack of opportunities can dampen interest in the work and result in frustration and boredom.

The company should have a training plan for you. What valuable new skills does the company plan to teach you?



The employer should give you some idea of promotion possibilities within the organization. What is the next step on the career ladder? If you have to wait for a job to become vacant before you can be promoted, how long does this usually take? When opportunities for advancement do arise, will you compete with applicants from outside the company? Can you apply for jobs for which you qualify elsewhere within the organization, or is mobility within the firm limited?

Salaries and benefits. When an employer makes a job offer, information about earnings and benefits are usually included. You will want to research to determine if the offer is fair. If you choose to negotiate for higher pay and better benefits, objective research will help you strengthen your case.



You may have to go to several sources for information. One of the best places to start is the information from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

You should also look for additional information, specifically tailored to your job offer and circumstances. Try to find family, friends, or acquaintances who recently were hired in similar jobs. Ask your teachers and the staff in placement offices about starting pay for graduates with your qualifications. Help-wanted ads in newspapers sometimes give salary ranges for similar positions. Check the library or your school’s career center for salary surveys such as those conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers or various professional associations.



If you are considering the salary and benefits for a job in another geographic area, make allowances for differences in the cost of living, which may be significantly higher in a large metropolitan area than in a smaller city, town, or rural area.

You also should learn the organization’s policy regarding overtime. Depending on the job, you may or may not be exempt from laws requiring the employer to compensate you for overtime. Find out how many hours you will be expected to work each week and whether you receive overtime pay or compensatory time off for working more than the specified number of hours in a week.



Also take into account that the starting salary is just that—the start. Your salary should be reviewed on a regular basis; many organizations do it every year. How much can you expect to earn after 1, 2, or 3 or more years? An employer cannot be specific about the amount of pay if it includes commissions and bonuses.

Benefits also can add a lot to your base pay, but they vary widely. Find out exactly what the benefit package includes and how much of the cost you must bear.








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Lowongan Telkom PT XL Maret 2011


Lowongan kerja Jakarta di perusahaan Telekomunikasi PT XL Axiata Tbk Maret 2011

PT XL Axiata Tbk. (‘XL’) was established on 8 October 1989, under the name PT Grahametropolitan Lestari. Its main business was in trading and general services.

Six years later, XL took an important step by setting up a partnership with Rajawali Group -a shareholder of PT Grahametropolitan Lestari – and three foreign investors
(NYNEX, AIF and Mitsui). Its name was changed to PT Excelcomindo Pratama, with the provisioning of basic telephony services as its core business.

XL commenced commercial operations in 1996, primarily covering Jakarta, Bandung and Surabaya areas. This made XL the first private company in Indonesia to provide
cellular mobile telephony services.

XL is now leading the industry as a cellular telecommunications provider with extensive coverage throughout Indonesia. It provides services for retail customers
and offers business solutions for corporate customers, including voice, data and other value-added mobile telecommunications services. XL operates its network with
GSM 900/DCS 1800 and IMT-2000/3G technologies. XL also holds a Closed Regular Network License, Internet Service Provider (ISP) License, Voice over Internet
Protocol (VoIP) License, and Internet Interconnection Services License (NAP).

Strategic Vendor Partnership, a new strategic unit under Strategic Partnership and Procurement Division (formerly Procurement and Logistic), is developed mainly to drive alignment between XL and strategic partners/major vendors in order to build, maintain, and enhance stronger and more beneficial relationships; and also to constantly create value out of the partnership.

Currently, we are fulfilling the resource who will act as partner to top level management in managing strategic partnership.


Executive – Strategic Vendor Partnership
(Jakarta Raya)

Requirements:
* University or post-graduate degree
* Minimum of 8 years experience, preferably in Network environment
* Strong strategic thinking and business acumen
* Excellent strategic negotiation skills
* Strong analytical and problem solving skills
* Excellent communication skills (verbal, written, presentation, persuasiveness)

Responsibilities:
* This is a general-manager equivalent level position which will work independently.
* Rotating to this position will be considered as rotation to different function.

* Key Responsibilities:
o Establish blueprint of strategic vendor partnership, such as developing principles for demand organization, governance procedures and contracts.
o Develop alignment between XL and strategic partners / major vendors. Provide inputs and recommendation when any alignment or modification is required in line with XL’s business model and strategy. To further anticipate of the upcoming mid and long term XL strategy (proactive role).
o Provide structure for potential new deals with strategic partners/ major vendors.
o Constantly looking on potential business value from the strategic partnership, in terms of business model, aggressive cost saving, or new technology.
o Obtain an integrated view of current arrangements and continues to assess for additional value.

Successful candidate will work in a result oriented and dynamic environment. Send your application and curriculum vitae before March 11, 2011.

Aplly online, click here
Closing Date: 30-3-11.

Tags: Lowongan Lulusan S1




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Job Interview Tips


An interview gives you the opportunity to showcase your qualifications to an employer, so it pays to be well prepared. The following information provides some helpful hints.



Preparation:

Learn about the organization.


Have a specific job or jobs in mind.

Review your qualifications for the job.


Be ready to briefly describe your experience, showing how it relates it the job.

Be ready to answer broad questions, such as “Why should I hire you?” “Why do you want this job?” “What are your strengths and weaknesses?”


Practice an interview with a friend or relative. More….

Evaluating a Job Offer



Once you receive a job offer, you must decide if you want the job. Fortunately, most organizations will give you a few days to accept or reject an offer.

There are many issues to consider when assessing a job offer. Will the organization be a good place to work? Will the job be interesting? Are there opportunities for advancement? Is the salary fair? Does the employer offer good benefits? Now is the time to ask the potential employer about these issues—and to do some checking on your own.


The organization. Background information on an organization can help you to decide whether it is a good place for you to work. Factors to consider include the organization’s business or activity, financial condition, age, size, and location.


You generally can get background information on an organization, particularly a large organization, on its Internet site or by telephoning its public relations office. A public company’s annual report to the stockholders tells about its corporate philosophy, history, products or services, goals, and financial status. Most government agencies can furnish reports that describe their programs and missions. Press releases, company newsletters or magazines, and recruitment brochures also can be useful. Ask the organization for any other items that might interest a prospective employee. If possible, speak to current or former employees of the organization.


Background information on the organization may be available at your public or school library. If you cannot get an annual report, check the library for reference directories that may provide basic facts about the company, such as earnings, products and services, and number of employees. Some directories widely available in libraries either in print or as online databases include:



Dun & Bradstreet’s Million Dollar Directory
Standard and Poor’s Register of Corporations
Mergent’s Industrial Review (formerly Moody’s Industrial Manual)
Thomas Register of American Manufacturers
Ward’s Business Directory

Stories about an organization in magazines and newspapers can tell a great deal about its successes, failures, and plans for the future. You can identify articles on a company by looking under its name in periodical or computerized indexes in libraries, or by using one of the Internet’s search engines. However, it probably will not be useful to look back more than 2 or 3 years.


The library also may have government publications that present projections of growth for the industry in which the organization is classified. Long-term projections of employment and output for detailed industries, covering the entire U.S. economy, are developed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and revised every 2 years. Trade magazines also may include articles on the trends for specific industries.



Career centers at colleges and universities often have information on employers that is not available in libraries. Ask a career center representative how to find out about a particular organization.

During your research consider the following questions:



Does the organization’s business or activity match your own interests and beliefs?

It is easier to apply yourself to the work if you are enthusiastic about what the organization does.


How will the size of the organization affect you?

Large firms generally offer a greater variety of training programs and career paths, more managerial levels for advancement, and better employee benefits than do small firms. Large employers also may have more advanced technologies. However, many jobs in large firms tend to be highly specialized.



Jobs in small firms may offer broader authority and responsibility, a closer working relationship with top management, and a chance to clearly see your contribution to the success of the organization.

Should you work for a relatively new organization or one that is well established?


New businesses have a high failure rate, but for many people, the excitement of helping to create a company and the potential for sharing in its success more than offset the risk of job loss. However, it may be just as exciting and rewarding to work for a young firm that already has a foothold on success.



The job. Even if everything else about the job is attractive, you will be unhappy if you dislike the day-to-day work. Determining in advance whether you will like the work may be difficult. However, the more you find out about the job before accepting or rejecting the offer, the more likely you are to make the right choice. Consider the following questions:

Where is the job located?
If the job is in another section of the country, you need to consider the cost of living, the availability of housing and transportation, and the quality of educational and recreational facilities in that section of the country. Even if the job location is in your area, you should consider the time and expense of commuting.



Does the work match your interests and make good use of your skills?
The duties and responsibilities of the job should be explained in enough detail to answer this question.

How important is the job to the company or organization?
An explanation of where you fit in the organization and how you are supposed to contribute to its overall goals should give you an idea of the job’s importance.



What will the hours be?
Most jobs involve regular hours—for example, 40 hours a week, during the day, Monday through Friday. Other jobs require night, weekend, or holiday work. In addition, some jobs routinely require overtime to meet deadlines or sales or production goals, or to better serve customers. Consider the effect that the work hours will have on your personal life.

How long do most people who enter this job stay with the company?
High turnover can mean dissatisfaction with the nature of the work or something else about the job.



Opportunities offered by employers. A good job offers you opportunities to learn new skills, increase your earnings, and rise to positions of greater authority, responsibility, and prestige. A lack of opportunities can dampen interest in the work and result in frustration and boredom.

The company should have a training plan for you. What valuable new skills does the company plan to teach you?



The employer should give you some idea of promotion possibilities within the organization. What is the next step on the career ladder? If you have to wait for a job to become vacant before you can be promoted, how long does this usually take? When opportunities for advancement do arise, will you compete with applicants from outside the company? Can you apply for jobs for which you qualify elsewhere within the organization, or is mobility within the firm limited?

Salaries and benefits. When an employer makes a job offer, information about earnings and benefits are usually included. You will want to research to determine if the offer is fair. If you choose to negotiate for higher pay and better benefits, objective research will help you strengthen your case.



You may have to go to several sources for information. One of the best places to start is the information from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

You should also look for additional information, specifically tailored to your job offer and circumstances. Try to find family, friends, or acquaintances who recently were hired in similar jobs. Ask your teachers and the staff in placement offices about starting pay for graduates with your qualifications. Help-wanted ads in newspapers sometimes give salary ranges for similar positions. Check the library or your school’s career center for salary surveys such as those conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers or various professional associations.



If you are considering the salary and benefits for a job in another geographic area, make allowances for differences in the cost of living, which may be significantly higher in a large metropolitan area than in a smaller city, town, or rural area.

You also should learn the organization’s policy regarding overtime. Depending on the job, you may or may not be exempt from laws requiring the employer to compensate you for overtime. Find out how many hours you will be expected to work each week and whether you receive overtime pay or compensatory time off for working more than the specified number of hours in a week.



Also take into account that the starting salary is just that—the start. Your salary should be reviewed on a regular basis; many organizations do it every year. How much can you expect to earn after 1, 2, or 3 or more years? An employer cannot be specific about the amount of pay if it includes commissions and bonuses.

Benefits also can add a lot to your base pay, but they vary widely. Find out exactly what the benefit package includes and how much of the cost you must bear.








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Lowongan BUMN Pramugari Garuda Jakarta Februari Maret 2011


Lowongan Kerja Pramugari Garuda Indonesia Seleksi Jakarta Februari Maret 2011

Garuda Indonesia adopted a Human Capital Management approach which perceives employees as assets with high levels of competitiveness. Engaged in the service industry, Garuda Indonesia acknowledges the importance of human resources in creating a strong and sustainable corporate performance. Therefore, since 2005 the Company has actively redefined its policies and human resources systems in order to be aligned with the Company’s grand strategy and objectives.

For Garuda Indonesia, people have always been the main priority. Employees can be viewed as human capital, implying that Garuda Indonesia’s employees have knowledge, skills and potential work habits that can support the Company’s productivity. In order to become valuable capital with a strong contribution to the organization, every employee has to have a healthy work spirit and hence will be competent enough for the organization.

Awarded as “The World’s Most Improved Airline” and certified as 4-Star Airline, Garuda Indonesia has been the leading airline in Indonesia and expanding throughout the world.
To support the company’s expansion plan, we invite young and dynamic individuals to join aou team as :

Flight Attendant (Pramugari)


Qualifications :

* Female, Single, Indonesian citizen
* Physycally and mentally healthy
* Age 20 – 25 years old
* Min. High School (SLTA) Graduates, preferably D3 above
* Height min. 160 cm with proporsional body weight and postures
* Not using eyeglasses, contact lenses are allowed
* Excelent command in English (spoken & written)

For further information, please call our recruitment team :
Office 021-2560 1038/1042; Mr Giring (0856 9275 0594); Ms. Risa (0857 1871 1837)
Monday-Friday, 07.30 – 16.30 WIB

Register youself online at :

* Recruitmen Garuda Indonesia

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lowongan kerja di BUMN jakarta,,lowongan pramugari garuda maret 2011

Job Interview Tips


An interview gives you the opportunity to showcase your qualifications to an employer, so it pays to be well prepared. The following information provides some helpful hints.



Preparation:

Learn about the organization.


Have a specific job or jobs in mind.

Review your qualifications for the job.


Be ready to briefly describe your experience, showing how it relates it the job.

Be ready to answer broad questions, such as “Why should I hire you?” “Why do you want this job?” “What are your strengths and weaknesses?”


Practice an interview with a friend or relative. More….

Evaluating a Job Offer



Once you receive a job offer, you must decide if you want the job. Fortunately, most organizations will give you a few days to accept or reject an offer.

There are many issues to consider when assessing a job offer. Will the organization be a good place to work? Will the job be interesting? Are there opportunities for advancement? Is the salary fair? Does the employer offer good benefits? Now is the time to ask the potential employer about these issues—and to do some checking on your own.


The organization. Background information on an organization can help you to decide whether it is a good place for you to work. Factors to consider include the organization’s business or activity, financial condition, age, size, and location.


You generally can get background information on an organization, particularly a large organization, on its Internet site or by telephoning its public relations office. A public company’s annual report to the stockholders tells about its corporate philosophy, history, products or services, goals, and financial status. Most government agencies can furnish reports that describe their programs and missions. Press releases, company newsletters or magazines, and recruitment brochures also can be useful. Ask the organization for any other items that might interest a prospective employee. If possible, speak to current or former employees of the organization.


Background information on the organization may be available at your public or school library. If you cannot get an annual report, check the library for reference directories that may provide basic facts about the company, such as earnings, products and services, and number of employees. Some directories widely available in libraries either in print or as online databases include:



Dun & Bradstreet’s Million Dollar Directory
Standard and Poor’s Register of Corporations
Mergent’s Industrial Review (formerly Moody’s Industrial Manual)
Thomas Register of American Manufacturers
Ward’s Business Directory

Stories about an organization in magazines and newspapers can tell a great deal about its successes, failures, and plans for the future. You can identify articles on a company by looking under its name in periodical or computerized indexes in libraries, or by using one of the Internet’s search engines. However, it probably will not be useful to look back more than 2 or 3 years.


The library also may have government publications that present projections of growth for the industry in which the organization is classified. Long-term projections of employment and output for detailed industries, covering the entire U.S. economy, are developed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and revised every 2 years. Trade magazines also may include articles on the trends for specific industries.



Career centers at colleges and universities often have information on employers that is not available in libraries. Ask a career center representative how to find out about a particular organization.

During your research consider the following questions:



Does the organization’s business or activity match your own interests and beliefs?

It is easier to apply yourself to the work if you are enthusiastic about what the organization does.


How will the size of the organization affect you?

Large firms generally offer a greater variety of training programs and career paths, more managerial levels for advancement, and better employee benefits than do small firms. Large employers also may have more advanced technologies. However, many jobs in large firms tend to be highly specialized.



Jobs in small firms may offer broader authority and responsibility, a closer working relationship with top management, and a chance to clearly see your contribution to the success of the organization.

Should you work for a relatively new organization or one that is well established?


New businesses have a high failure rate, but for many people, the excitement of helping to create a company and the potential for sharing in its success more than offset the risk of job loss. However, it may be just as exciting and rewarding to work for a young firm that already has a foothold on success.



The job. Even if everything else about the job is attractive, you will be unhappy if you dislike the day-to-day work. Determining in advance whether you will like the work may be difficult. However, the more you find out about the job before accepting or rejecting the offer, the more likely you are to make the right choice. Consider the following questions:

Where is the job located?
If the job is in another section of the country, you need to consider the cost of living, the availability of housing and transportation, and the quality of educational and recreational facilities in that section of the country. Even if the job location is in your area, you should consider the time and expense of commuting.



Does the work match your interests and make good use of your skills?
The duties and responsibilities of the job should be explained in enough detail to answer this question.

How important is the job to the company or organization?
An explanation of where you fit in the organization and how you are supposed to contribute to its overall goals should give you an idea of the job’s importance.



What will the hours be?
Most jobs involve regular hours—for example, 40 hours a week, during the day, Monday through Friday. Other jobs require night, weekend, or holiday work. In addition, some jobs routinely require overtime to meet deadlines or sales or production goals, or to better serve customers. Consider the effect that the work hours will have on your personal life.

How long do most people who enter this job stay with the company?
High turnover can mean dissatisfaction with the nature of the work or something else about the job.



Opportunities offered by employers. A good job offers you opportunities to learn new skills, increase your earnings, and rise to positions of greater authority, responsibility, and prestige. A lack of opportunities can dampen interest in the work and result in frustration and boredom.

The company should have a training plan for you. What valuable new skills does the company plan to teach you?



The employer should give you some idea of promotion possibilities within the organization. What is the next step on the career ladder? If you have to wait for a job to become vacant before you can be promoted, how long does this usually take? When opportunities for advancement do arise, will you compete with applicants from outside the company? Can you apply for jobs for which you qualify elsewhere within the organization, or is mobility within the firm limited?

Salaries and benefits. When an employer makes a job offer, information about earnings and benefits are usually included. You will want to research to determine if the offer is fair. If you choose to negotiate for higher pay and better benefits, objective research will help you strengthen your case.



You may have to go to several sources for information. One of the best places to start is the information from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

You should also look for additional information, specifically tailored to your job offer and circumstances. Try to find family, friends, or acquaintances who recently were hired in similar jobs. Ask your teachers and the staff in placement offices about starting pay for graduates with your qualifications. Help-wanted ads in newspapers sometimes give salary ranges for similar positions. Check the library or your school’s career center for salary surveys such as those conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers or various professional associations.



If you are considering the salary and benefits for a job in another geographic area, make allowances for differences in the cost of living, which may be significantly higher in a large metropolitan area than in a smaller city, town, or rural area.

You also should learn the organization’s policy regarding overtime. Depending on the job, you may or may not be exempt from laws requiring the employer to compensate you for overtime. Find out how many hours you will be expected to work each week and whether you receive overtime pay or compensatory time off for working more than the specified number of hours in a week.



Also take into account that the starting salary is just that—the start. Your salary should be reviewed on a regular basis; many organizations do it every year. How much can you expect to earn after 1, 2, or 3 or more years? An employer cannot be specific about the amount of pay if it includes commissions and bonuses.

Benefits also can add a lot to your base pay, but they vary widely. Find out exactly what the benefit package includes and how much of the cost you must bear.








Comments are closed.




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